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Feature Article

Recognition and management of ocular rosacea

Stephanie L Watson, Minas T Coroneo

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Abstract

Chronic ocular discomfort and redness from ocular rosacea and facial erythema from cutaneous rosacea both respond to oral tetracyclines. Coexisting dry eye and blepharitis including meibomian gland dysfunction are common and must also be treated.

Key Points

  • Rosacea, a chronic skin condition characterised by facial hyperaemia, is common and often undiagnosed. Ocular rosacea occurs in about 50% of all patients with cutaneous rosacea.
  • There is no association between the severity of cutaneous rosacea and the extent of ocular involvement. Although skin signs typically precede ocular signs, a diagnosis of ocular rosacea should be considered in a patient who presents with ocular discomfort, redness and intermittent visual blurring.
  • Coexisting dry eye and blepharitis including meibomian gland dysfunction are common with ocular rosacea. Educating patients on how to perform eyelid hygiene is an important part of the management of these associated conditions.
  • Cutaneous and ocular rosacea respond to oral tetracyclines.

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