Advertisement
Women's health

Managing chronic pelvic pain in girls and women

Susan Evans

Figures

An updated version is available in the linked supplement

Abstract

Women with chronic pelvic pain have often experienced pain since adolescence as well as self-doubt, which often results in difficulties in personal development, relationships and sexual confidence. The management approach outlined in this article can help to improve outcomes for these patients.

Article Extract

When a woman presents with a long list of pelvic pain complaints, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed, especially as time is often limited. Frequently, the patient has experienced pain for years before making the decision that ‘something must be done’, and presents to her doctor distressed and desperate.

Women with chronic pelvic pain have often experienced pain since adolescence accompanied by self-doubt, resulting in difficulties in personal development, relationships, sexual confidence, educational achievement and financial opportunities. Their pain is a taboo topic with embarrassing gender, fertility and sexual issues, not suitable for easy conversation with family or friends. When the pain is severe, affected women often stay home isolated and distressed.

This article outlines an approach to the management of women with chronic pelvic pain, which can lead to improved outcomes for affected patients.

Figures