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Reflections: 60 Years of Medicine Today

Kim Oates, Peter A. Castaldi, Audra Barclay, JUDY PASSLOW
OPEN ACCESS

We are proud of our editorial independence. All articles are peer reviewed by at least three specialists in the relevant field, including a GP. All authors are required to disclose any commercial or financial association that could be, or even seen to possibly be, a conflict of interest. We do not accept papers that have any known input from pharmaceutical companies, other commercial groups or public relations firms. This independence and peer-review process have made us credible and trusted.

Sixty years ago, when our name was Modern Medicine of Australia, the journal was owned by The New York Times publishing house, with much of the content coming from doctors in the USA. As we developed, our Australian content increased particularly through the 1990s, and in 2000, our 43rd year, we became independent, fully Australian owned, with content written by leading Australian experts. It was time to change our name to Medicine Today. 

Over the years, we have listened to our readers, opinion leaders and consultants and made changes appropriately, resulting in feature articles, flowcharts, patient handouts to use in the surgery and regular short articles covering 20 different aspects of medicine, including our Dermatology Clinic, Emergency Medicine, Practical Procedures, Gastroenterology Clinic, Travel Medicine Update and Infectious Diseases Clinic. And of course the popular In Brief and Journal Watch sections present news items about recent research, with commentary on its significance by a relevant expert.

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The journal has expanded into an impressive family of publications, including Cardiology Today, Endocrinology Today, Pain Management Today and Respiratory Medicine Today, all overseen by senior clinicians as editors-in-chief and editorial boards of specialists appropriate to the topic. As with Medicine Today, they all have the same editorial independence and avoidance of conflict of interest.

What will the next 60 years bring? Looking at the speed of change in recent years, we can be quite confident that future advances in health care will be even more rapid and more astounding than in the past 60 years. Based on so many unanticipated discoveries in our first 60 years, the only accurate prediction is that the advances are likely to be so great that they are unpredictable.

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But I think it’s safe to predict that Medicine Today, in some form, will still be here, continuing to develop like a fine red wine and providing practical, clinically focused, evidence-based information that will help GPs and others provide better care for their patients.

Professor Oates is Chair of the Board of Honorary Consultants, Medicine Today; and Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW.

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