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Sexual health

Responding to Australia’s chlamydia epidemic

LOUISE TOMLINS, SHAILENDRA SAWLESHWARKAR, DAVID A. LEWIS

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Abstract

The incidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection has risen steadily over the past decade and remains unacceptably high. Increased opportunistic screening of those most likely to be infected is essential, along with prompt management of the infection and contact tracing.

Article Extract

Chlamydia trachomatis causes a highly transmissible and mostly asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection (STI), which can lead to significant morbidity if left untreated, particularly in women. It is the most common bacterial STI in Australia, with 86,108 notifications in 2014.1 Three-quarters of infections occur in young people aged between 15 and 29 years Alarmingly, the notification rate in the Indigenous population is three times that in the general population at 1266 per 100,000 people.1

Picture credit: © Dr_Microbe/iStockphoto.com

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