Ophthalmology clinic

Strabismus: what GPs need to know

Ophthalmology clinic

Strabismus: what GPs need to know

PARTH R. SHAH

Figures

© meepoohyaphoto/ stock.adobe.com model used for illustrative purposes only
© meepoohyaphoto/ stock.adobe.com model used for illustrative purposes only

Abstract

Strabismus is a common disorder in children and adults that is often perceived as complicated and perplexing. Assessment and management of strabismus can be simplified through an understanding of the common conditions and patterns of presentation.

Article Extract

Strabismus, also known as ‘squint’, is a misalignment of the visual axes of the two eyes. It is a common disorder, with a prevalence of 3% in children and adults.1 Esotropia is a convergent misalignment where the eyes cross inward. A divergent misalignment, where one or both eyes look outward, is known as exotropia. The prevalence of strabismus varies by ethnic background, with esotropia more common in western populations and exotropia more common in Asians.2