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Regular GP visits after heart attack reduces rehospitalisation and death risks

For patients discharged from hospital after CHD, regular contact with a GP is associated with a reduced risk of having an emergency hospital readmission for CVD, reports a new AIHW study. The study, Transition Between Hospital and Community Care for Patients with Coronary Heart Disease, examined health services used by more than 37,300 people with CHD discharged from a public hospital in New South Wales or Victoria between April 2012 and June 2013. In the two years after discharge, one in four patients had an emergency readmission relating to CVD and one in 10 patients died. Patients with at least one GP or cardiologist follow up, or who claimed a new chronic disease management plan, within two years of discharge had a 5 to 11% lower risk of CVD readmission and 4 to 6% lower risk of CVD death than those not using these services. Readmission was 12 to 13% lower for patients visiting a GP once or twice each month for the two years than those who did not visit a GP. Most patients had visited a GP within two years of discharge; 61% within the first week and 23% between eight and 30 days. www.aihw.gov.au/reports/heart-stroke-vascular-diseases/transition-hospital-community-care-heart-disease/contents/table-of-contents

National Health Survey finds two-thirds of Australian adults obese or overweight

Two-thirds (67%) of Australian adults were overweight or obese in 2017-18, compared with 63.4% in 2014-15, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ latest National Health Survey. Adults categorised as obese increased from 27.9% in the previous survey in 2014-15 to 31.3% in 2017-18, driving the overall increase. The survey reported a large increase in overweight and obesity in people aged 18 to 24 years, with 38.9% overweight or obese in 2014-15 compared with 46.0% in 2017-18. It also found that more men than women aged 18 years and over were overweight or obese in 2017-18 (74.5% and 59.7%, respectively), and in children aged 5 to 17 years, rates of obesity and overweight (24.9%) had remained stable over the past 10 years. Read other results of the survey at the ABS website (http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/
abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4364.0.55.001~2017-18~Main%20Features
~Key%20Findings~1
).