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Reflections: 60 Years of Medicine Today

Kim Oates, Peter A. Castaldi, Audra Barclay, JUDY PASSLOW
OPEN ACCESS

The future - what's in the pipeline?

The publishers of Medicine Today believe in print. Digital disruption has been a real force for some years, but the actual impact of digital media is only now becoming clear.

Worldwide, newspapers in print are under siege and seemingly fighting a losing battle, although there remains a hard core of readers who love all that black ink. Niche journals and magazines have fared better and indeed are enjoying somewhat of a renaissance. The publishers of Medicine Today have invested in independent research on doctors’ preferred sources of information, repeated four times since 2006, most recently in November 2015. The data clearly show that GPs have remained avid followers of traditional media. Print clinical journals are not going to disappear any time soon. Annual syndicated readership surveys show that within the month of publication Medicine Today is read by 69% of all GPs. In the following weeks that figure reaches virtually 100%.

So what next for Medicine Today? Our rigorously peer-reviewed content will continue to evolve to meet our readers’ needs. Feature articles attract the highest readership so will always have a place. New clinics will be added in response to feedback from readers and changes in medical practice. Do not hesitate to let us know if there is anything you would like covered. We are listening and you can help shape our future!

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We are also looking to bring the world of scientific and medical breakthroughs to your inbox in an easy-to-digest form. As this issue goes to press, Cardiology Today staff are attending the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona to provide coverage for Australian readers. Ninety-second video highlights are available by email with links to more information should you desire it. We will also provide print coverage in the October issue of Cardiology Today. If this style of reporting proves popular we will do more of it. Perhaps you can’t make it to such international conferences yourself, so why not let us go for you?

What else might lie ahead? The pace of change has been so rapid over the past 10 years that it is impossible to imagine where we might be or what we might look like in another 10. One thing we feel certain of – Medicine Today and its sister journals will still be there, helping the GPs of today and tomorrow keep up to date just as we have done since 1957.

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Thank you for joining us on this journey.

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