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Emergency medicine

Tonsillitis: the worst-case scenario

Sascha Fulde, Gordian Fulde
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Figures

© oneinchpunch/shutterstock model used for illustrative purposes only
© oneinchpunch/shutterstock model used for illustrative purposes only

Abstract

As a GP working in your own practice and the local emergency department, you frequently see patients who present with a sore throat and associated symptoms.

Article Extract

The case

A 19-year-old girl presents to the emergency department (ED) with three days of sore throat. She has had associated headache, nausea, subjective fevers and malaise. Today her headache has been getting worse throughout the day, so she presented to hospital. She saw her GP 24 hours ago and was started on cefalexin 500 mg four times daily. She has recently travelled interstate to compete in a triathlon, but has not travelled internationally. She has no known infectious contacts. She has no known medical diagnoses and takes no regular medications.

Figures

© oneinchpunch/shutterstock model used for illustrative purposes only
© oneinchpunch/shutterstock model used for illustrative purposes only