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Men's health

Recognising androgen deficiency in adolescent boys

EMILY PAPADIMOS, Jennifer Batch

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© JAN H ANDERSEN/SHUTTERSTOCK MODEL USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© JAN H ANDERSEN/SHUTTERSTOCK MODEL USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

Abstract

Parents who have concerns about their child’s growth and puberty will often seek advice from their GP. Many parents, however, are often not aware that their child’s pubertal progress is abnormal. A clear understanding of normal male pubertal milestones is essential for GPs to recognise when puberty is abnormal.

Article Extract

Case scenario

Daniel, aged 16 years, was accompanied by his father for a routine review of seasonal asthma with his GP. His father’s main concern was that Daniel seemed physically immature compared with his peers. Daniel was an otherwise healthy, prepubertal boy who was taking an inhaled corticosteroid as needed. Further history taking revealed that Daniel’s father had also been a late developer; he reported that he had been still growing while at university.

 

Figures

© JAN H ANDERSEN/SHUTTERSTOCK MODEL USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© JAN H ANDERSEN/SHUTTERSTOCK MODEL USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY