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Feature Article

Male genital dermatology. Part 2: Noninflammatory lesions

Anthony Hall

Figures

© ISM/SOVEREIGN/MEdICAL IMAGES X-RAY SHOWING CANCER OF THE GLANS PENIS ANd URETHRA
© ISM/SOVEREIGN/MEdICAL IMAGES X-RAY SHOWING CANCER OF THE GLANS PENIS ANd URETHRA

Abstract

Many male patients with genital disease have an underlying fear of genital cancer. A compassionate approach, accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment and follow up are essential to minimising personal and relationship distress for patients with benign, premalignant or malignant lesions.

Key Points

  • Accurate diagnosis of any hyperpigmented genital lesion is important as such lesions may raise concerns about genital melanoma.
  • Genital melanotic macules need to be differentiated from melanoma.
  • Genital dysaesthesia is an increasingly recognised disorder of male genitalia that often leads to marked distress.
  • Genital seborrhoeic keratoses need to be differentiated from sexually acquired genital warts (condyloma acuminata) because a wrong diagnosis may lead to both significant personal and relationship distress.
  • Penile intraepithelial neoplasia or in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most important premalignant male genital skin disease.
  • Penile SCC is an uncommon cancer affecting mostly uncircumcised older men that is increasing in the developed world.

Figures

© ISM/SOVEREIGN/MEdICAL IMAGES X-RAY SHOWING CANCER OF THE GLANS PENIS ANd URETHRA
© ISM/SOVEREIGN/MEdICAL IMAGES X-RAY SHOWING CANCER OF THE GLANS PENIS ANd URETHRA