Advertisement
Paediatrics clinic

Managing complex and persisting pain in children and adolescents

John Collins, NATASHA HAYNES, MEG POUNDER, RENEE SANDELLS

Figures

© STEVE DEBENPORT/ ISTOCKPHOTO.COM MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© STEVE DEBENPORT/ ISTOCKPHOTO.COM MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

Abstract

Persisting pain in children and adolescents is prevalent. GPs should consider early referral of young patients with complex or persisting pain to a multidisciplinary paediatric pain clinic that adopts a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management. This may prevent the possible consequences of long-term pain, including psychological sequelae, school and social disruption and disability.

Article Extract

Pain is experienced as ‘an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage’.1 Pain is a subjective experience modified not only by biological factors, but also by previous painful experiences, the meaning and social context of the pain, fear, anxiety, depression and a range of other issues.

 

Figures

© STEVE DEBENPORT/ ISTOCKPHOTO.COM MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© STEVE DEBENPORT/ ISTOCKPHOTO.COM MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY