Infectious diseases clinic

Diabetic foot infections

Infectious diseases clinic

Diabetic foot infections

THOMAS R. SCHULZ, PAUL R. WRAIGHT

Figures

© SCIENCE SOURCE/MICHELE S. GRAHAM/MEDICAL IMAGES
© SCIENCE SOURCE/MICHELE S. GRAHAM/MEDICAL IMAGES

Abstract

Up to a third of people with diabetes will develop foot wounds and these can become infected and be difficult to manage. An interdisciplinary approach that aims to address the underlying causes can achieve higher rates of wound healing and a reduced time to wound closure, thus reducing the risk of amputation.

Article Extract

It is estimated that up to a third of all individuals with diabetes will develop a wound on their feet during their lifetime.1 This in turn increases the risk of infection, ranging from superficial wound infections to infection of deeper structures, including bone. The main contributing reasons to wound development are:

  • peripheral neuropathy
  • foot deformities
  • foot trauma.