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Drug update

What’s new in menopausal hormone therapy: combination oestrogen–bazedoxifene

Rod Baber

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Abstract

A product combining conjugated estrogens with the selective oestrogen receptor modulator, bazedoxifene, rather than a progestin is a recent new option for postmenopausal women with an intact uterus seeking relief from menopausal symptoms. 

 

Article Extract

The publication of data from the combined hormone replacement therapy arm of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002 led to a stunning rejection of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the treatment of symptoms of the menopause.1 Harms were said to be excessive and benefits few. Those early and dramatic claims of excessive harm broadcast by the WHI investigators have now been largely replaced by a much more considered position, which confidently states that when MHT is prescribed for healthy, recently postmenopausal women, its benefits far outweigh its risks. International guidelines and position statements all concur.2,3

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© highwaystarz/stock.adobe.com MODEL USED FOR ILLUSTRaTIVE PURPOSES ONLY