Therapeutics clinic

SGLT-2 inhibitors: practical prescription advice for the generalist

RAHUL D. BARMANRAY, DEEPA ARIARAJAH, DEV A. KEVAT

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PORNCHAI SODA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
PORNCHAI SODA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

Abstract

Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are an increasingly popular oral therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes owing to their glycaemic, cardiovascular and other benefits. However, risks include dehydration, urogenital infections and ketoacidosis. A four-phase approach to selecting, counselling and following up patients can help GPs prescribe SGLT-2 inhibitors safely and effectively.

Article Extract

On the strength of cardiovascular outcome trial results, the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor medication class has become an increasingly popular diabetes therapy in Australia.1 Four SGLT-2 inhibitors were approved by the TGA for use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: dapagliflozin, empagliflozin, ertugliflozin and canagliflozin. All except canagliflozin are currently available through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), both alone and in fixed-dose combinations with metformin or a dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor (linagliptin, saxagliptin or sitagliptin).

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PORNCHAI SODA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
PORNCHAI SODA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM