Paediatrics clinic

Understanding developmental co-ordination disorder

Paediatrics clinic

Understanding developmental co-ordination disorder

NATALIE ONG, NATALIE FAIRBAIRN, DIANA BARNETT

Figures

© soloviova liudmyla/ stock.adobe.com model used for illustrative purposes only
© soloviova liudmyla/ stock.adobe.com model used for illustrative purposes only

Abstract

Developmental co-ordination disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can affect a child’s daily activities, social and leisure participation, academic achievement and emotional and psychological wellbeing. Awareness and diagnosis by primary healthcare professionals will help families and children by enabling timely intervention to improve outcomes.

Article Extract

Developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) is a potentially lifelong neurodevelopmental condition in which motor skill performance is delayed, awkward, slow or poorly co-ordinated to the extent that it affects everyday tasks. This can in turn affect the individual’s academic progress, social integration and emotional development. It typically occurs in 5 to 6% of school-aged children.1 Research has shown that the incidence of DCD is much higher in children who were born preterm or with low birthweight and in boys.2