Drug update

A new low-dose levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive

Kathleen McNamee, Deborah Bateson

Figures

© FRUTTIPICS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
© FRUTTIPICS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

Abstract

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) provide high-efficacy, cost-effective contraception suitable for most women across the reproductive life course. The PBS-listed 19.5 mg levonorgestrel intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective LARC option with a lower hormonal dose and smaller frame size than the 52 mg levonorgestrel IUD.

Article Extract

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are universally recognised as providing high-efficacy, cost-effective contraception that can be a used by most patients across the reproductive life course.1,2 The most recent published nationally representative data from 2012-13 found that about 6% of women in Australia using contraception were using an intrauterine device (IUD); although this figure is likely to have increased, uptake still appears relatively low compared with other high-income countries.3,4 The introduction of a new PBS-listed IUD on 1 March 2020 that has a smaller frame and lower levonorgestrel (LNG) dose than the 52mg LNG IUD (Mirena) offers an additional LARC choice. The availability of the 19.5mg LNG IUD (Kyleena) is likely to enhance overall awareness and uptake of LARCs across Australia and to contribute to a reduction in unintended pregnancies and abortions.

Figures

© FRUTTIPICS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
© FRUTTIPICS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM