Therapeutics clinic

Immunotherapy for cancer and immune-related adverse events

Therapeutics clinic

Immunotherapy for cancer and immune-related adverse events

ABHISHIKTA DEY, ALJOSJA ROGIERS, GEORGINA V. LONG, Leslie Schrieber

Figures

© royaltystockphoto/ istockphoto.com
© royaltystockphoto/ istockphoto.com

Abstract

Immune checkpoint inhibitors that remove the ‘brakes’ on the body’s immune system, enhancing its attack on cancer cells, have revolutionised the treatment of many cancers. However, these medications can cause a wide range of immune-related adverse events that GPs need to be aware of.

Article Extract

Immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors has revolutionised the treatment of many cancers. These medications have provided durable responses and excellent long-term outcomes in a substantial subset of patients with a range of cancer types, including melanoma, renal cell carcinoma and non-small cell lung cancer.1 Immune checkpoints are regulators that modulate physiological immune responses and maintain self-tolerance.2 Checkpoint inhibitors can disrupt this interaction and enhance the activity of the immune system against cancer cells. However, they can also induce inflammatory and other immune-related adverse events (AEs).3