Women's health

A Cervical Screening Program update: the intermediate risk pathway, the co-test and self-collection

Women's health

A Cervical Screening Program update: the intermediate risk pathway, the co-test and self-collection

Deborah Bateson, Lara Roeske

Figures

© fatcamera/istockphoto.com models used for illustrative purposes only
© fatcamera/istockphoto.com models used for illustrative purposes only

Abstract

Cervical screening guidelines have changed significantly in recent years and continue to evolve as evidence about human papillomavirus testing emerges, especially regarding intermediate risk results and the role of self-collection. 

Article Extract

The renewed National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP) was implemented in November 2017 following extensive modelling studies, which showed that a switch from cytology testing to primary human papilloma virus (HPV) testing in the context of the school-based HPV vaccination program would result in up to 30% fewer cancers.1 In the renewed NCSP, screening occurs every five years from the age of 25 until a final exit test between 70 and 74 years of age. The Cancer Council Australia Guidelines provide comprehensive clinical practice guidance for primary care and specialist clinicians and is updated to reflect emerging evidence.2 The introduction of the NCSP was also accompanied by a change from state- and territory-based registries to a single National Cancer Screening Register (NCSR), responsible for all screening invitations and reminders for eligible people. The NCSR Healthcare Provider Portal is now accessible via a PRODA account through most medical record software programs, enabling point of care access to a patient’s screening history, which can be updated by healthcare providers as well as laboratories and patients.